My Business Story

Graphic Designer Turns Hobby Into Thriving Business

A creative artist who took graphic design as a hobby has turned his passion into a successful venture enlisting the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, amongst others, as clients.

Nothing gets Harry Bassey animated as a conversation about graphic design: “I’ve always had a love for art and design, so even in my spare time I would constantly study and research about it. I was job-hunting and things were not going my way, so I decided instead of sitting idle I could use this opportunity to chase a passion of mine,” he told us.

For some, graphic design and art may be just a hobby or side hustle, but for Harry, it means a lot more.

Sharing his passion for the profession, Harry said, “I’ve never viewed the profession as just a hobby. It’s something that I have been interested in most of my life I knew there were opportunities in this field with lots of room for growth if done the right way. I knew that if I dedicated myself to constant growth, acquisition of skills and adaptability, the sky was the limit. It’s more than graphic design; its art, it’s marketing. It’s being able to convey a message to an audience through the mediums I choose to work in.”


Business brief:
Business started: 2014
Instagram: @hebconcepts


Harry was so convinced that he could stand out in the overcrowded field of graphic design that he started HEB Concepts from personal savings and help from family and friends.

His first job was not encouraging, but he was not deterred by the experience.

Going down memory lane, he recalled, “My first paid job was creating a logo for a friend’s clothing company. The pay was almost nothing but when you want people to take a chance on you sometimes you have to pay your dues, and that sometimes involves not really focusing on the pay but instead the opportunity.”

As an entrepreneur, he understands and has mastered the benefit of starting with the people closest to one. According to him, they are the ones who initially believe and invest in you.

Harry said once family and friends endorse you, you are in business. “The projects just start coming in and once the projects started coming in for me with more consistency, and I could see based on my past work that clients really trusted me with the growth of their business, I knew I was in business. Being entrusted with that responsibility really made me understand that I had something valuable to offer and I shouldn’t take it for granted.”



When you are a creative there are no defined work hours; you don’t just clock out at 5pm as long as there’s work to be done. Every project is different. You have to treat each client uniquely and tailor the experience to suit them, making sure they leave satisfied



Although Harry works alone most of the time, his company, HEB Concepts, has a network of designers, artists, printers and creative people whom he draws from whenever he wants to realize a client’s vision.
Does he think that technology and graphic arts software have diminished the human touch in creative work?

Harry said, “Technology and software are just tools; it is the individual behind them that makes the difference. A computer programme does not give you the creativity, vision or foresight to determine how to best communicate the client’s message. Everybody has access to a camera but still it’s those with the innate talent and that have dedicated time to honing that skill that stand out. Technology and software constantly improve a graphic artist but at the end of the day it is the ingenuity of the people behind it that makes the difference.”

He shared some of the challenges of starting HEB Concepts: “Building awareness of my services and communicating to people the value of those services were a challenge. Art is subjective, people place different value on what a design or advertisement means to them or their business. When you see a company as successful and has been existing as long as Coca-Cola, yet you still see the investment they make in marketing and promotions and that’s because you can never become complacent relaying your value to your customer base.”

Harry has designed for Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CBS Group, Silverbird, Jolene Hair and Cosmetics, Dunes Center and many other high-profile clients relying on three creeds: adaptability, evolution and collaboration.

“When you are a creative there are no defined work hours; you don’t just clock out at 5pm as long as there’s work to be done. Every project is different. You have to treat each work uniquely and tailor the experience to suit them, making sure they leave satisfied. You can never know enough; no one person possesses all the skills and talent to meet every need.”

Harry hinges HEB Concepts’ continual growth and increasing capacity on these principles.